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IN THE NEWS

 
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WHY ARE YOUNG AMERICANS KILLING THEMSELVES? SUICIDE IS NOW THEIR SECOND-LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH.

New York Times - January 6, 2020

Teenagers and young adults in the United States are being ravaged by a mental health crisis — and we are doing nothing about it. As of 2017, statistics show that an alarming number of them are suffering from depression and dying by suicide. In fact, suicide is now the second leading cause of death among young people, surpassed only by accidents.

After declining for nearly two decades, the suicide rate among Americans ages 10 to 24 jumped 56 percent between 2007 and 2017, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And for the first time the gender gap in suicide has narrowed: Though the numbers of suicides are greater in males, the rates of suicide for female youths increased by 12.7 percent each year, compared with 7.1 percent for male youths.

FCC UNANIMOUSLY APPROVES PROPOSAL FOR NEW 3-DIGIT NUMBER AS SUICIDE PREVENTION HOTLINE

December 15, 2019

Washington (CNN)The Federal Communications Commission is moving ahead with plans to designate a three-digit number to reach the National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 988.

The five-member commission unanimously voted on Thursday to approve the proposal, which is now open for public comment, and start the rulemaking process.

"988 has an echo of the 911 number we all know as an emergency number. And we believe that this three-digit number dedicated for this purpose will help ease access to crisis services, it will reduce the stigma surrounding suicide and mental health conditions, and ultimately it will save lives," Chairman Ajit Pai said Thursday during the commission's open December meeting.

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MENTAL HEALTH: EXPERT TIPS ON TACKLING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

BBC News - January 2, 2020

Top internet searches for 18 to 34-year-olds often include questions about mental health.

Here, we ask the experts to tackle some of the most commonly-asked queries from Wales and across the UK.

Why don't men ask for help when they feel depressed?

Research by charity Mental Health Foundation showed men were less likely than women to seek help when feeling depressed.

They are also more likely to seek help in A&E when their depression is at an acute stage, rather than earlier at a GP surgery.

Ann John, a professor of medicine at Swansea University, said: "I think stereotypes still prevail and some men feel that it's not OK for them to say they are not coping."

"There are novel ways to get men to talk, such as in Men's Sheds and at the barber's.

"But it seems men can feel very ashamed when they feel depressed and we need to improve the stigma people feel and provide resources online, as this is where young people are expressing themselves.

"Luckily, more role models such as the boxer Tyson Fury and footballer Rio Ferdinand are coming out and speaking about their difficulties."

Mental Health Foundation said only about half of young people were confident about where to go to find help, with a similar amount comfortable speaking about their emotions with others.

SUICIDE IS GROWING HEALTH CRISIS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN YOUTH

NBC News October 8, 2019

She started having suicidal thoughts at 11 or 12. She didn’t know the words to name it. She had no idea what it was, but she consistently had these urges to end her life.

“I just wanted to be dead,” she says.

One night when she was 24, and already long diagnosed with clinical depression, she succumbed to the feelings.

“I couldn’t suppress these thoughts anymore,” she recalls. “I had thought about ending my life for eight straight months.

“I texted a friend and said, ‘It would be better if I wasn’t here.’ That friend did not know that I had already taken substances in the hope that I would go to sleep and not wake up. And while I was waiting to die, the police showed up.”

T-Kea Blackman, now 29, survived that attempt and dedicated her life to helping others navigate the darkness of depression and mental health crises.

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AFTER PARTNER'S DEATH, REP. SUSAN WILD FINDS NEW MISSION IN SUICIDE PREVENTION

USA Today September 19, 2019

WASHINGTON –  Rep. Susan Wild grabbed from the stack of unopened condolence cards in her office. 
The pile has gotten smaller over the months, as she reads through them when she needs words of love or encouragement. They help on the dark days or in the moments where she can't help but think of her partner of 17 years, Kerry Acker. They also help to serve as a reminder...

SIX QUESTIONS THAT MAY HELP STOP A SUICIDE

Washington Post September 22, 2019

In any given month, nearly 4,000 Americans commit suicide, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. That’s about 129 a day. 

Among them, in the last half year, were the suicides of two students who survived the 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, along with the father of a 6-year-old who had been killed during the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut.

The mother of one of the Douglas suicides, Sydney Aiello, said her daughter had suffered from survivor’s guilt after 14 of her classmates (including her best friend) and three teachers died. Aiello had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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PROGRAM TO PREVENT SUICIDE BY VETERANS EARNS BIPARTISAN SUPPORT

New York Times - September 20, 2019

PHOENIX — Gloribel Ramos sunk slightly under the weight of her 32-pound body armor and gingerly gripped a plastic facsimile of an M4 rifle as she prepared to watch a video of a roadside bomb detonated in Iraq, all so she could better understand the experience of war and its impact on people who have fought in one.


Along with about three dozen other people gathered here, she had joined an effort to stem veteran suicide, one heavily reliant on civilians in the community willing to take the time to learn the warning signs rather than depend only on the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has for years failed on its own to turn the tide of veteran suicides.

UI ADDRESSES SUICIDE AWARENESS MONTH

The Daily Illini - September 19, 2019

The University’s Counseling Center and Student Assistance Center emphasize the importance of addressing mental health and suicide, especially in the month of September, National Suicide Prevention Month.

According to the Illinois Department of Public Health, in the state of Illinois, “suicide is the 11th leading cause of death resulting in more than 1,000 deaths each year.” A study from the Anxiety and Depression Association of America found one in five college students has considered suicide.

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THE QUESTIONS EVERY LEADER SHOULD BE ASKING ABOUT SUICIDE PREVENTION AND MENTAL WELLNESS

Forbes - September 10, 2019

Business leaders care about return on investment, so much so that it’s easy to get the idea that they care more about the numbers than they do about their employees. That’s not true, of course. What is true is that most CEOs don’t want to know the details of programs and plans that are being created to help people with their mental health and to prevent suicide. They want to know what managers do all day in human resources or marketing or diversity & inclusion that is benefiting the bottom line or paving the way for future growth.

What nobody wants to say: the benefits of mental wellness programs can’t be boiled down to a number or a chart. It’s traditionally been very difficult to get leaders to spend much time talking about the issue...